Radiowaves and ink

Little penguins, emus, and lorikeets! We've been talking about Prattle, scoop, trembling: a flutter of Australian birds on the radio, fleetingly, sheepishly.

You can hear us prattling and chirruping,
In conversation with Sara Savage, Parallel Lines, RRR, Wednesday 7th of December, 2016
and
In conversation with Stefanie Kechayas, Arts Weekly, 3MBS, Saturday 26th of November, 2016

And in print,
'The Inner Heartbreak of Birds is Revealed by Flight Paths in Australian Art,' Financial Review, Saturday 25th of November, 2016

With Alicia and Michael (The Light Between Oceans), Cary and Deborah (An Affair to Remember), Leo and Kate (Titanic), Olive spots our collage, Underneath Soane's 'star-fish' ceiling, the library at No. 12 proved anything but quiet, in the Australian Financial Review

With Alicia and Michael (The Light Between Oceans), Cary and Deborah (An Affair to Remember), Leo and Kate (Titanic), Olive spots our collage, Underneath Soane's 'star-fish' ceiling, the library at No. 12 proved anything but quiet, in the Australian Financial Review

Within a museum; within a gallery

Recently landed: Within a museum; within a gallery, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes you behind-the-scenes in the gallery

Installing our artists' book, Prattle, scoop, trembling: a flutter of Australian birds at MPRG

Fabrication

Recently landed: Fabrication, Gracia's written response to Matthew Day's Assemblage #1, for Fjord Review

Any time between 3pm and 6pm. That was the deal. Any time within a window. And with freedom to explore. Come and go, as you please. The doors will be left open. Take photos, should you choose. Inhabit the space as you would a public area. Like a park, say. Be a living part of an assemblage. Move within the space. Walk through to the library. Squat beneath the window, recline on the slope, lean against the wall, perch on the ledge just inside the door: it’s up to you. Come, stay, and go, as you please, the invitation stood. 

When only recently I thought how I would like to have experienced Ashley Dyer’s
Tremor (at Arts House) as a durational piece, with the chance to select my own vantage, here was my chance to experience a new work by Dancehouse artist-in-residence, Matthew Day. Assemblage #1 was my chance to encounter dance as I do art, to treat the performance as I would a painting, installation, sculpture, readymade, or a Fluxus box of matches.1 And yet rather unsurprisingly, I conformed to theatre standards. 

I arrived just before 3pm. I arrived for the start of a work with no real start. And I was not alone. In the foyer on a quiet Saturday afternoon, a small knot of people waited for the dance to begin. As I collected my tickets from the box office/bar, Day was at the sink getting a glass of water. Upon seeing the waiting spectators, I wondered if he was disappointed by our collective missed opportunity to enter a theatre-cum-gallery and wonder: what did I miss? What happened before? Has the dancer been here all day? Will the dancer leave? Is this art? Is this dance? Is there a difference? And does it matter?

Matthew Day's Assemblage #1 at Dancehouse (Image credit: Gregory Lorenzutti)

A gleam in the darkling world

Recently landed: A gleam in the darkling world, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) places Prattle scoop trembling: a flutter of Australian birds in the gallery

Prattle, scoop, trembling: a flutter of Australian birds

We are looking forward to installing our artists' book, Prattle, scoop, trembling: a flutter of Australian birds upon the shelves and plinths of Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery as part of their exhibition, Birds: Flight Paths in Australian Art, which runs until the 12th of February, 2017.

Follow the process
#PrattleScoopTrembling

A female Magnificent riflebird (Ptiloris magnificus) from our most recent artists' book, Prattle, scoop, trembling: a flutter of Australian birds

In the library, a herd of Superb fairy-wrens

Recently landed: In the library, a herd of Superb fairy-wrens, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) calls Prattle scoop trembling: a flutter of Australian birds all done and dusted

Fifty pages, all at once, our birds in the State Library of Victoria

Darkly, silvered, a grassland

Recently landed: Darkly, silvered, a grassland, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes you to Ashley Dyer's Tremor, Arts House, North Melbourne Town Hall

Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament, Christchurch, New Zealand, 2011 (Image credit: David Wethey)

Aftershock

Recently landed: Aftershock, Gracia's written response to Ashley Dyer's Tremor, for Fjord Review

Darkly, silvered, a grassland of manmade forms grows. It grows in the North Melbourne Town Hall. It is, for now, neatly contained within the designated performance space, but like all things in nature, it is as predictable as it is unpredictable. This constructed grassland of “over 270 poles, strips, or sheets of aluminium, brass, copper and sprung steel” hums with life. Its presence felt from the moment I enter the space.

Two blocks make an imperfectly perfect grid. One block is comprised of nine shake tables, arranged in three ordered bands. The second block is longer, and it is comprised of six shake tables divided by two narrow pathways that lead to a central path. A central path in a metal wilderness is a safe place to get one’s bearings. As the grassland sings and shimmers, you’d be well advised to stick to the path; those rods have teeth and they are not afraid to bite. And perhaps like all things that can bite, it is beautiful to behold. A vibrating platform2 of interconnected wooden panels that simulate an earthquake, this is also a musical instrument, a living sculpture, a stage, and a potential disaster zone. Fashioned from timber and springs, it “is a kinetic sculpture and performance where vibration is heard through our ears, seen through our eyes, felt through our bodies, but understood with our imaginations.” Upon encountering it, I want to walk around this sculpture, to see it from all sides. To get up close and see how the light bounces differently off the varied components, but for this 360-degree picture I will have to use my imagination. I take my seat in the dark. I wait.

This feels personal. With choreographer, Ashley Dyer, I have spluttered and choked in the smoke (Life Support, 2013). With dancer, Nat Cursio I have sat cross-legged and built lego houses (In the Middle Room, 2014), grieved (Recovery, 2014), and sawn the legs off chairs (A String Section, 2015). This is personal, and yet not. This is bigger than me. In part, this work is a response to the 2011 magnitude 6.3 earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand. Early on a Tuesday afternoon the ground shook so violently, killing 185 people and injuring several thousand. 100,000 buildings were damaged, and 10,000 needed to be demolished. Tremor is, by definition, ‘a seismic shaking movement of the ground before or after an earthquake or volcanic eruption.’

Ashley Dyer's Tremor (Image credit: Bryony Jackson)

Extended exhibition dates

Our 74 drawings, prints, collages, and a knot of books, as part of Here, there, will be catching reflections for your amusement until the morning of Tuesday the 22nd of November. Catch them before the circus is peeled and packed away at Port Jackson Press Print Gallery, 84 Smith Street, Collingwood.

Here, there in the window a little while longer

Gracia & Louise: Little Gems For The Choosing

Recently landed: Gracia & Louise: Little Gems For The Choosing, a new article on Port Jackson Press Print Gallery, and in the window too, until Thursday the 17th of November

Our Here, there characters, in the window of Port Jackson Press Print Gallery

"Lost in a wilderness of listening leaves"

Recently landed: "Lost in a wilderness of listening leaves," a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes a look at our forthcoming artists' book to be exhibited as part of Birds: Flight paths in Australian Art at Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery in December

Our artists' book, Prattle, scoop, trembling: a flutter of Australian birds, is nearing completion

Free Postage November

Free postage! Free postage! Zines to Reykavick! Prints to Footscray! All November long, we are offering FREE POSTAGE worldwide on all orders placed through our online store.

Simply enter the code freepostagenov upon checkout.

A pen-and-ink sketch of a fish footman presenting an envelope with the address and postage stamp, on an envelope from Hastings to France 9 August 1881, franked with the 5d. indigo, S.G.K6, tied by the Censing Station Road, Hastings code 'F' squared-circle date stamp, Calais à Ville transit 10 August opposite, Lille date stamp of arrival on the reverse the same day, addressed to Mademoiselle Burnblum in Lille

In the window

Recently landed: In the window, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes a look at our current window exhibition at Port Jackson Press Print Gallery

74 Salvaged Relatives collages on cartes de visite, drawings, and prints in the window of Port Jackson Press Print Gallery

Here, there, in the window

74 collages on cartes de visite, drawings with gold and silver edges, and a wood engraving can be found pressed to the glass until Thursday the 17th of November.

Here, there
Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison
in the window of
Port Jackson Press Print Gallery
84 Smith Street, Collingwood

Yesterday, installing our pieces in the window and catching reflections

Yesterday, installing our pieces in the window and catching reflections

Milly Sleeping: SHOE

Tiny Tap, a moving collage, in something of a growing tradition, created especially for Milly Sleeping's October month of SHOE project on instagram. 50 looped frames and fireflies to make Pietro Longhi's Portrait of a Venetian Family with a Manservant Serving Coffee, c. 1752, tappity-tap.

Earlier,
Ornament, 2015
Nice Work, 2013
To Good Year's End, 2012
Hidden Gems & Rough Diamonds, 2012
I Feel Fine and Borrow, 2009

Tiny Tap for Milly Sleeping

Prattle, scoop, trembling: a flutter of Australian birds

Work on our forthcoming artists' book, Prattle, scoop, trembling: a flutter of Australian birds, is well underway.

It will be exhibited as part of Birds: Flight paths in Australian art, at Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, early December, 2016.

Prattle, scoop, trembling, taking shape on the working table