Like Light

Recently landed: Like Light, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) looks at the installation process of It came like light out of the walls

Cutting into the vinyl pieces and making them into something new was even more enjoyable than we’d expected it to be. We had followed a plan for the top peaks and bottom pools, and allowed our scissors to glide in the middle. And we’ll do it again with what remains. We are so glad we had the chance to make this piece, to reinvent the original printing of Ripples in the Open.

File under ‘Eye’

Recently landed: File under ‘Eye’, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes you on a virtual tour of Through a glass eye at the Australian Print Workshop

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Through a glass eye, at the Australian Print Workshop until Saturday the 29th of June, 2019 (image credit: Tim Gresham)
(This work was produced with APW Printers at Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, as part of Australian Print Workshop’s French Connections project curated by APW Director Anne Virgo OAM)

It came like light out of the walls

You’re invited.

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison
It came like light out of the walls
and
Kyoko Imazu
In the Neighbourhood

Thursday 13th June – Sunday 21st of July, 2019
West Gallery Thebarton
32 West Thebarton Road, Thebarton, South Australia

If you live nearby or are passing through, please call in to explore our collage with your own eyes. And should you feel inclined, please share an image or two (#Itcamelikelightoutofthewalls).

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison_It came like light out of the walls_62.jpg
“The stability of nature can no longer be taken for granted”

Recently landed: “The stability of nature can no longer be taken for granted”, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) looks at our functioning (or not) ecosystem on the page as part of our forthcoming exhibition, It came like light out of the walls

A Pacific walrus rests at the top of steep cliffs in Russia, still from ‘Frozen Worlds’ episode, Our Planet, 2019 (image credit: Sophie Lanfear/Silverback/Netflix)

Keep an eye on

Recently landed: Keep an eye on, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) introduces you to the prints within our current exhibition

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Not a royal residence but a garrison fortress, lithograph with hand-colouring. Image drawn directly on to the lithographic plates by the Artists and processed, proofed and printed in three colours from three plates, by APW Printer Martin King and hand-coloured by the Artists, at Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, 2019.

In the museum

Recently landed: In the museum, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) introduces you to the specimens within Through a glass eye

(This work was produced with APW Printers at Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, as part of Australian Print Workshop’s French Connections project curated by APW Director Anne Virgo OAM)

Watercolour and pencil, blue, green, more

Recently landed: Watercolour and pencil, blue, green, more, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) looks at the hand-colouring process of our Through a glass eye prints, created as part of the Australian Print Workshop’s French Connections project

(This work was produced with APW Printers at Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, as part of Australian Print Workshop’s French Connections project curated by APW Director Anne Virgo OAM)

Through a glass eye

We are delighted to invite you to our exhibition Through a glass eye at the Australian Print Workshop. If you are free and curious to see this work with your own eyes, we’d love to see you at the opening.

APW President Joe Connor & APW Director Anne Virgo OAM invite you to the first exhibition of APW’s French Connections project

Australian Print Workshop is proud to present the results of a major international project French Connections, curated by APW Director Anne Virgo OAM, planned in collaboration with the National Gallery of Australia and made possible by the generous support of The Collie Print Trust.

Four leading contemporary Australian artists, Martin Bell, Megan Cope, Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison joined APW on an ambitious research trip to Paris (May 2018), to explore French Connections with our region — with a particular emphasis on the interplay of natural history, the history of science, empire, art and anthropology relating to early French exploration of Australia and the Pacific, as well as other French/Australian connections.

APW and the Artists’ privileged access to study rarely seen and highly significant collections in leading museums has informed and inspired the production of an exciting new body of work in the print medium. This is the first of a series of French Connections exhibitions at APW Gallery.


Opening
2 pm – 4 pm
Saturday 1st of June, 2019

The exhibition runs until Saturday the 29th of June, 2019.

Australian Print Workshop
210 Gertrude Street, Fitzroy
Tuesday to Saturday 10 am – 5 pm

#FrenchConnectionsAPW

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, At the Musée Fragonard d’Alfort, etching with hand-colouring. Image drawn directly on to the copper plate by the Artists and processed, proofed and printed in an edition of 20 (plus proofs), in three colours from one plate, by APW Printer Martin King and hand-coloured by the Artists, at Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, 2019.

Trees of Life for The Big Issue

Happy to see our collage created especially for Sophie Cunningham’s City of Trees: Essays on Life, Death and the Need for a Forest (‘Trees of Life’ by Raphaelle Race, p. 30) in the current edition of The Big Issue (17–30 May, 2019, No. 587), with Greta Thurnberg on the cover.

We heartily recommend you grab a copy of both book and magazine.

Windigo

Recently landed: Lurking Within, Gracia's written response to Windigo by Lara Kramer, for Fjord Review

Max Porter’s novel Lanny begins with Dead Papa Toothwort slipping “through one grim costume after another as he rustles and trickles and cusses his way between the trees”. He is the Green Man myth of decay and renewal, of chaos growing into hope; “he pauses as an exhaust pipe, then squirms into the shape of a rabbit snare, then a pissed-on nettle into pink-strangled lamb. He plucks a blackbird from the sky and cracks open the yellow beak. He peers into the ripped face as if it were a clear pond. He flings the bird across the forest stage, stands up woodlot bare, bushy, and stamps his splattered feet.” He is tree bark and discarded Western rubbish. He changes form. He is unfixed and without end. He pauses, roughly the size of a flea, to listen to and gargle the fizz of human sound.

And I am reminded of this shapeshifting ability each time I enter Dancehouse not knowing where I will go and what the space will be, pausing, in my own way, as an exhaust pipe before later mutating into a flea. I am especially reminded of this as I enter the upstairs theatre space for the white-cell artifice and confinement of Lara Kramer’s
Windigo, were performers Jassem Hindi and Peter James wait.

Hindi and James are two sunken forms, slouched into (and possibly becoming) two mattresses. They continue to mark time as the audience fills ‘their’ space, their no-man’s land, and assume it for their own: that’s the one-sided deal, right? They are wasting time, in a wasteland of debris and mattresses. And they are in a way, jangling in their “various skins, wearing a tarpaulin gloaming coat . . . . tingling with thoughts of how one thing leads to another again and again, time and again, with no such thing as an ending”.

Windigo (image credit: Frederic Chais)

Imprint: A Survey of the Print Council of Australia

Lovely to see our Print Council of Australia 2004 commission, A lament to the sleeping kingfisher, on display as part of Imprint: A Survey of the Print Council of Australia at Parliament House, Canberra, until the 12th of May, 2019.

This special exhibition featuring prints from the Print Council of Australia’s archival collection includes some of the first prints created by significant Australian artists, including the first Print Commissions, John Brack’s Untitled (Skaters), 1967, and Fred Williams’ Lysterfield, 1968, and the first Indigenous Australian Print Commission, Bush Figures by Ku Ku Imidji man Arone Raymond Meeks, along with works produced by PCA founders Grahame King and Udo Sellbach.

The Commission, which began in 1967, invites artists to submit a limited-edition print for consideration by the PCA and its members. This has resulted in an archive of more than 600 prints, illustrating the rich history of contemporary Australian printmaking.

Works of master printers and innovators including Noel Counihan, Barbara Hanrahan, David Rose, Ray Beattie, Bea Maddock, Earle Backen, Ruth Faerber, Hertha Kluge-Pott, Olga Sankey, Judy Watson, Janet Dawson, Mary MacQueen, Raymond Arnold, G.W. Bot, Yvonne Boag, James Taylor, John Coburn, Jenuarrie Warrie, Maria Kozic, Wilma Tabacco, Rick Amor, Treahna Hamm, Robert Jacks, Bruno Leti, John Olsen, Michael Kempson, Susan Pickering, Andrew Ngungarrayi Martin, Belinda Fox, Georgia Thorpe, Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Gosia Wlodarczak, Rebecca Mayo, Janet Parker-Smith, Rona Green, Sophia Szilagyi, Glen Mackie, Tama Favell, Elizabeth Banfield, David Fairbairn, Graeme Drendel, Deanna Hitti, Sue Poggioli, Maria Orsto, Samuel Tupou, Pia Larsen, Deborah Klein, Cat Poliski, Heather Koowootha and Glenda Orr will also be on show, as will a diverse range of printing techniques representing styles from the late 1960s: from relief printing (carving into lino or wood where recessed areas don’t hold ink and transfer to paper ink-free) to intaglio (etching, engraving, aquatint, drypoint, mezzotint) and planographic (lithography and screen-printing) as well as digital printing.

While the exhibition is mostly Print Council of Australia works — fifty-eight works — the remainder are from the Australian Parliament House Art Collection, including two new acquisitions, linocuts by artist Jenny Kitchener, recipient of the 2017 Print Council Commission.

The Print Council of Australia was established in Melbourne in 1966 by printmakers Udo Sellbach, Grahame King and curator Dr Ursula Hoff to promote the artform of printmaking. The 1940s–60s had seen the return to Australia of European-trained artists, sparking a resurgence in the importance of printmaking and its commercial viability.
(Print Council of Australia)

Lovely to see our Print Council of Australia 2004 commission,  A lament to the sleeping kingfisher,   hanging on the wall

Lovely to see our Print Council of Australia 2004 commission, A lament to the sleeping kingfisher, hanging on the wall

Dark Night

Recently landed: Dark Night, Gracia's written response to Dark Night by Jill Orr and Quake by Hellen Sky, presented as part of Dance Massive 2019, for Fjord Review

It is the smell of composted ingredients I notice first as I make my way along the passage. A blend of animal manure, rainforest mulch, leaf mould, washed river sand, and loam, giving off that warm garden smell. A mound of steamy soil, piled high in the Magdalen laundry of the Abbotsford Convent; a soil mix for holding moisture in a space still damp from its history. Soil might be a source of nutrients for growth, but in the dirt and dust and sadness of the laundry, its steam is overpowering on a humid autumn night.

Change the location, and a normally pleasing smell of pottering about in the garden alters how it is felt. This cavernous space is airless. I feel like I am being herded into a shed, like livestock penned in against the night and her predators, albeit gently, curiously, by a raft of smiling ushers who motion with torches “mind the cables,” “there’s room along the side wall.” Sand, sphagnum peat moss, perlite, overwhelming! Overhead, a moth crashes into the light. It flutters. I stand. There are not enough seats. (Earlier, audience members who most needed a seat had been asked to come forward.) Grass clippings, fungi, and bacteria! Vermiculite, from the Latin vermiculari, to ‘be full of worms,’ too. The urge to flee, or at least stand near to an exit is strong: I don’t want to put down roots here, in neither laundry’s past nor soiled, oppressive present.

And yet I do, for atop this mountain ‘full of worms’ sails Jill Orr. Majestic and unassuming, simultaneously. Both as assured captain of the craft and as a canvas for the audience to project their own thoughts upon. Legendary. Orr and her boat. Her surname alone, an oar, a navigational means, but I reckon she’d be pretty tired of hearing that. Presented by Dancehouse in partnership with the Abbotsford Convent as part of Dance Massive 2019, “emerging from an installation conceived for the Venice Biennale as a response to the terrible fate of asylum seekers arriving by boat to Australian shores, Dark Night explores the crumbling humanitarian ideals of a world in crisis. In this embodied installation, embracing the dramatics of scale, volume, tone, rhythm and movement, a series of images are performed.”

Dark Night  (image credit: Gregory Lorenzutti)

Dark Night (image credit: Gregory Lorenzutti)