MIFF 2019, from present to past tense

Recently landed: MIFF 2019, from present to past tense, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) unspools forty-four films seen over seventeen days

Nissrine Erradi and Lubna Azabal, in a scene from Maryam Touzani’s Adam (2019)

Sights Unseen: Recent Acquisitions from the Moreland Art Collection

We are delighted that our artists’ book, Salvaged Relatives, edition III will be on display.

In recent years the Moreland Art Collection has experienced significant gains through purchases, commissions and a marked increase in the receipt of philanthropic donations.

Sights Unseen: Recent Acquisitions from the Moreland Art Collection draws together artworks held by the municipality not previously exhibited at the Counihan Gallery In Brunswick.

Comprising photography, painting, drawing, prints, collage, artists books and mixed media the artworks reflect a diverse range of contemporary practice as well as some fascinating historical offerings — a trove of cultural heritage for the City of Moreland.

Charles Blackman, Trevor ‘Turbo’ Brown, Noel Counihan, Julian Di Martino, Gabrielle de Vietri, Rennie Ellis, Helga Groves, Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Joy Hester, Deanna Hitti, Janelle Low, Kirsten Lyttle, Jordan Marani, Jill Orr, Louise Paramour, Wolfgang Sievers, Shaun Tan, Stephanie Valentin, Stephen Wickham, James Wigley


Sights Unseen: Recent Acquisitions from the Moreland Art Collection

Saturday 27th July – Sunday 18th August, 2019
Counihan Gallery In Brunswick
233 Sydney Road, Brunswick

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison
Salvaged Relatives, edition III
2014–2015
Artists’ book, unique state, featuring 21 individual collages on cabinet cards with pencil and paint additions (by Gracia Haby)
Housed in a three-colour cloth Solander box (by Louise Jennison) with inlaid collage, In the borrowed costume of a Polovtsian warrior (Prince Igor c. 1909–37)

Salvaged Relatives

Recently landed: Salvaged Relatives, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes a look back at an artists’ book soon to be on display as part of Sights Unseen: Recent Acquisitions from the Moreland Art Collection

Iurii Annenkov, La Nijinska, Ballet Russes (Poster for Les Biches and Le Train Bleu created by Bronislava Nijinska for the Ballet Russes), 1924, lithograph with hand additions

Other Worlds 2019 Short story competition

Our print, And Zarafa Kept Walking, from 2013 is one of two artworks you can write or recite a story in response to, as part of the Other Worlds: 2019 Short story competition. Entries close Sunday the 21st of July, 2019.

Moreland City Libraries’ Short story competition

Writers of all ages are welcome to enter Moreland City Libraries’ Other Worlds 2019 Short story competition. Your story can be written in 500 words (or less) OR recited in 5 minutes (or less)

To enter, complete a Short story competition entry form (PDF 1Mb) or obtain one from your local library.
Contact
Moreland City Council
Moreland City Libraries
readmore@moreland.vic.gov.au

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison,   And Zarafa Kept Walking  , 2013, four-colour lithographic offset print on Fabriano Artistico 300gsm traditional white hot-press paper, 33cm X 23cm

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, And Zarafa Kept Walking, 2013, four-colour lithographic offset print on Fabriano Artistico 300gsm traditional white hot-press paper, 33cm X 23cm

Near to the lake’s edge

Recently landed: Near to the lake’s edge, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes you to Jean-Christophe Maillot’s LAC

Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo in LAC by Jean-Christophe Maillot (image credit: Alice Blangero)

Light and Shade

Recently landed: Light and Shade, Gracia's written response to LAC presented by The Australian Ballet, for Fjord Review

A bevy of black swans circled our car parked near to the lake’s edge. It was my first encounter with a black swan, nose to beak, separated only by a wind-up wind-down window pane. I would have been no taller than one of the swans, had I’ve been out of the car. I remember feeling awestruck by their scale, their very presence. And yet as I was four-years-of-age, or thereabouts, is this a later addition stitched to a memory derived from family folklore? My Mum recalled one of the swans hopped up on the car’s bonnet, but wonders now if such a spectacle is likely. A small car buried beneath a mountain of feathered bodies, it is almost a cartoon image — better yet, a cinematic one — when viewed from a human perspective. In territorial union to our intrusion, the swans rallied, and looped for me a definitive impression of swans, lakes, and Tchaikovsky.

The swans of my memory and family folklore were not so unlike the hissing, awe-inspiring Chimeras within Jean-Christophe Maillot’s
LAC, a modern telling of Swan Lake, performed with attack by the renowned Ballets de Monte-Carlo. Imposing, glorious, memorable.

In
LAC, Maillot, together with writer Jean Rouaud, resurrected “these buried experiences”, albeit against a more “Machiavellian, family backdrop …. to present a ballet of contrasts. The change from animal into human being infuse[d] the entire work and question[ed] our own nature. We believe that we differ from animals because of our ability to make choices. But is this all we are capable of? …. Perhaps our humanity ultimately lies in this unsophisticated insatiability that defines us from our first cry — We want everything!”

Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo in LAC by Jean-Christophe Maillot (image credit: Alice Blangero)

Small things; precious things

Recently landed: Small things; precious things, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) looks at our contribution to the Black-throated Finch Project

Adani is saying the birds can just fly somewhere else — well, I’m afraid to say there are very few places left for our threatened species to just fly somewhere else, so that’s just a joke.
— Sean Dooley, Birdlife Australia

We created twenty original postcard collages for our contribution to the 2019 Black-throated Finch Project

Like Light

Recently landed: Like Light, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) looks at the installation process of It came like light out of the walls

Cutting into the vinyl pieces and making them into something new was even more enjoyable than we’d expected it to be. We had followed a plan for the top peaks and bottom pools, and allowed our scissors to glide in the middle. And we’ll do it again with what remains. We are so glad we had the chance to make this piece, to reinvent the original printing of Ripples in the Open.

File under ‘Eye’

Recently landed: File under ‘Eye’, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes you on a virtual tour of Through a glass eye at the Australian Print Workshop

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Through a glass eye, at the Australian Print Workshop until Saturday the 29th of June, 2019 (image credit: Tim Gresham)
(This work was produced with APW Printers at Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, as part of Australian Print Workshop’s French Connections project curated by APW Director Anne Virgo OAM)

It came like light out of the walls

You’re invited.

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison
It came like light out of the walls
and
Kyoko Imazu
In the Neighbourhood

Thursday 13th June – Sunday 21st of July, 2019
West Gallery Thebarton
32 West Thebarton Road, Thebarton, South Australia

If you live nearby or are passing through, please call in to explore our collage with your own eyes. And should you feel inclined, please share an image or two (#Itcamelikelightoutofthewalls).

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison_It came like light out of the walls_62.jpg
“The stability of nature can no longer be taken for granted”

Recently landed: “The stability of nature can no longer be taken for granted”, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) looks at our functioning (or not) ecosystem on the page as part of our forthcoming exhibition, It came like light out of the walls

A Pacific walrus rests at the top of steep cliffs in Russia, still from ‘Frozen Worlds’ episode, Our Planet, 2019 (image credit: Sophie Lanfear/Silverback/Netflix)

Keep an eye on

Recently landed: Keep an eye on, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) introduces you to the prints within our current exhibition

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Not a royal residence but a garrison fortress, lithograph with hand-colouring. Image drawn directly on to the lithographic plates by the Artists and processed, proofed and printed in three colours from three plates, by APW Printer Martin King and hand-coloured by the Artists, at Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, 2019.

In the museum

Recently landed: In the museum, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) introduces you to the specimens within Through a glass eye

(This work was produced with APW Printers at Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, as part of Australian Print Workshop’s French Connections project curated by APW Director Anne Virgo OAM)

Watercolour and pencil, blue, green, more

Recently landed: Watercolour and pencil, blue, green, more, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) looks at the hand-colouring process of our Through a glass eye prints, created as part of the Australian Print Workshop’s French Connections project

(This work was produced with APW Printers at Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, as part of Australian Print Workshop’s French Connections project curated by APW Director Anne Virgo OAM)

Through a glass eye

We are delighted to invite you to our exhibition Through a glass eye at the Australian Print Workshop. If you are free and curious to see this work with your own eyes, we’d love to see you at the opening.

APW President Joe Connor & APW Director Anne Virgo OAM invite you to the first exhibition of APW’s French Connections project

Australian Print Workshop is proud to present the results of a major international project French Connections, curated by APW Director Anne Virgo OAM, planned in collaboration with the National Gallery of Australia and made possible by the generous support of The Collie Print Trust.

Four leading contemporary Australian artists, Martin Bell, Megan Cope, Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison joined APW on an ambitious research trip to Paris (May 2018), to explore French Connections with our region — with a particular emphasis on the interplay of natural history, the history of science, empire, art and anthropology relating to early French exploration of Australia and the Pacific, as well as other French/Australian connections.

APW and the Artists’ privileged access to study rarely seen and highly significant collections in leading museums has informed and inspired the production of an exciting new body of work in the print medium. This is the first of a series of French Connections exhibitions at APW Gallery.


Opening
2 pm – 4 pm
Saturday 1st of June, 2019

The exhibition runs until Saturday the 29th of June, 2019.

Australian Print Workshop
210 Gertrude Street, Fitzroy
Tuesday to Saturday 10 am – 5 pm

#FrenchConnectionsAPW

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, At the Musée Fragonard d’Alfort, etching with hand-colouring. Image drawn directly on to the copper plate by the Artists and processed, proofed and printed in an edition of 20 (plus proofs), in three colours from one plate, by APW Printer Martin King and hand-coloured by the Artists, at Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, 2019.

Trees of Life for The Big Issue

Happy to see our collage created especially for Sophie Cunningham’s City of Trees: Essays on Life, Death and the Need for a Forest (‘Trees of Life’ by Raphaelle Race, p. 30) in the current edition of The Big Issue (17–30 May, 2019, No. 587), with Greta Thurnberg on the cover.

We heartily recommend you grab a copy of both book and magazine.

Windigo

Recently landed: Lurking Within, Gracia's written response to Windigo by Lara Kramer, for Fjord Review

Max Porter’s novel Lanny begins with Dead Papa Toothwort slipping “through one grim costume after another as he rustles and trickles and cusses his way between the trees”. He is the Green Man myth of decay and renewal, of chaos growing into hope; “he pauses as an exhaust pipe, then squirms into the shape of a rabbit snare, then a pissed-on nettle into pink-strangled lamb. He plucks a blackbird from the sky and cracks open the yellow beak. He peers into the ripped face as if it were a clear pond. He flings the bird across the forest stage, stands up woodlot bare, bushy, and stamps his splattered feet.” He is tree bark and discarded Western rubbish. He changes form. He is unfixed and without end. He pauses, roughly the size of a flea, to listen to and gargle the fizz of human sound.

And I am reminded of this shapeshifting ability each time I enter Dancehouse not knowing where I will go and what the space will be, pausing, in my own way, as an exhaust pipe before later mutating into a flea. I am especially reminded of this as I enter the upstairs theatre space for the white-cell artifice and confinement of Lara Kramer’s
Windigo, were performers Jassem Hindi and Peter James wait.

Hindi and James are two sunken forms, slouched into (and possibly becoming) two mattresses. They continue to mark time as the audience fills ‘their’ space, their no-man’s land, and assume it for their own: that’s the one-sided deal, right? They are wasting time, in a wasteland of debris and mattresses. And they are in a way, jangling in their “various skins, wearing a tarpaulin gloaming coat . . . . tingling with thoughts of how one thing leads to another again and again, time and again, with no such thing as an ending”.

Windigo (image credit: Frederic Chais)