Melbourne Art Book Fair 2019

We’re excited to be returning to the NGV Melbourne Art Book Fair for our fifth year.

NGV Melbourne Art Book Fair
Great Hall, NGV, 180 St Kilda Road

Thursday 14th March
6–9pm Melbourne Art Book Fair opening event

Friday 15th March
10am–5pm Melbourne Art Book Fair
5.30–10pm Melbourne Art Book Fair (part of NGV Friday Nights)

Saturday 16th March
10am–5pm Melbourne Art Book Fair

Sunday 17th March
10am–5pm Melbourne Art Book Fair

#MelbourneArtBookFair
#NGV

(Read more: Whirr and chime, Marginalia)

Nineteen: a compilation box of zines, 2017 – 2018

A limited edition compilation set of all our recent zines, one atop the other, from the largest to the smallest, to make a happy squeeze.

As with previous sets, each box set contains the first of each zine edition released within that time frame. Housed in giant matchboxes featuring our recent collaged landscape, Ripples in the Open, editions are in the process of being delivered to the collections of Melbourne University Library, National Library of Australia, and State Library Victoria.

From 2017
Limbed
Winged
Dove, love, wash
Here, there
Duck in, duck out
Flippered and flightless
Pattern
Round, circle, dot
Take a lesson from the ground
Seasonal museum sketches (autumn)
It was a familiar pattern


From 2018
Your gelatine silver print, in the shape of the full moon
Paw Pad Path
Looped
I think all the world is falling
No longer six feet under
Disrupted and rumpled
Dim wood, spark bright
A warmed pebble in my hand

We have two more sets left, if you are interested. Please contact us to find out more.

 

Dancing Qweens

Recently landed: Dancing Qweens, Gracia's written response to James Welsby’s exploration of 50 years of queer dance history, at Dancehouse, for Fjord Review

There is a photo of me dancing in the lounge room of my family home. My arms are flung wide overhead, making the Y shape to the Village People’s Y.M.C.A.. My mouth is parted in a smile, mid pronunciation of the letter Y. Caught in a moment of bliss and expression on the imaginary dancefloor before the fireplace. I am dancing with my younger cousin, following the playful choreography. The letter M: let your elbows point like rabbit ears on your head. The letter C: hug a beach ball to the left-hand side. The letter A: arms overhead once more, fingers touching to create a triangle. My favourite record is spinning, and I am happy. In the adjoining room, the grown-ups are presumably talking about grown-up stuff, missing all the fun, until my Dad picked up the camera and recorded this moment for posterity.

The year captured in the discoloured photograph is 1980. I am five years old. My memory can no longer tell me what costume I imagined myself to be wearing, but I feel certain there were feathers and sequins in there.

***

“Patterns or sequins?” enquires “Mad Fox” Maggie. Sequins, please, I think. Anything, I say. “How about this black dress with sequins on the hip?”

Valerie Hex (James Welsby) in Dancing Qweens (image credit: Matto Lucas)

Open until the 28th of January!

Hoot! Hoot! Our exhibition, Ripples in the Open, was meant to close today at 5pm, however we are delighted to announce that it will be open for tomorrow’s public holiday, Monday the 28th of January, from 9am to 5pm.

Ripples in the Open
ArtSpace at Realm
Ringwood Town Square (opposite the Ringwood Railway Station)
179 Maroondah Highway, Ringwood, 3134

Be a warm note of embellishment

Recently landed: Be a warm note of embellishment, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes you to Soliloquy, a one-hour performance of Georg Telemann’s Twelve Fantasias for Solo Flute performed on recorder by Genevieve Lacey, conveying that music lies in the soul, beyond one’s control

39 volunteer participants (including Louise Jennison) and Genevieve Lacey performing in Soliloquy, 2018 (image credit: Pia Johnson)

Soliloquy

Recently landed: Soliloquy, Gracia's written response to Genevieve Lacey’s recent performance of Georg Telemann’s Twelve Fantasias for Solo Flute, directed by Gideon Obarzanek and Stephanie Lake, with 38 volunteers, for Fjord Review

Soliloquy is a revelation of the intimate, shared. In the embrace of lights lowered to a fireside glow, from their seats in the theatre, the volunteers rise and softly thread their way onto to the stage to join Lacey as she plays. Summoned by Lake’s cue, and also by a call in the music, and perhaps a call within to respond, here is a rare gift! Together, a new autonomous structure grows through repeated motifs. Lake makes a sundial of her hands, and the participants follow suit. Fingers echo rainfall, puff an organ’s bellows, hug a cloud. Whether all moving as one mass (seated on the stage) or in their own interpretive swim (dancing around Lacey), truth is offered, felt, and, it feels, collectively accepted. Within such a gift, the self dissolves. Dive in!

In the lead-up to
Soliloquy, a call for volunteers with “no music or dance experience necessary” was answered by 38 people, including my partner, Louise Jennison, who leapt at the opportunity to become a flowing quaver motion. Just as Lacey’s connection to Telemann’s Twelve Fantasias for Solo Flute is wound up in the personal, for Jennison, accepting the open invitation was also of a personal nature: a chance to prove to herself that her body can continue to deal with the limitations placed upon it by post-surgical chronic pain and emerge triumphant. Facing our fears and vulnerability takes courage, and here was the opportunity to open oneself up to new rhythms.

Here, too, was the opportunity to view things from a different perspective: moving from a seat in the theatre to participating on the stage; from far to near, so close you could hear the sound of Lacey’s fingers upon her recorder as she played; from inward to outward, allowing oneself to be a part of a framework bigger than the self. And like all gifts shared, this was for us all. For those in the audience, like me, moved to tears of joy and release. Whether you are transmitting joy through a “noodling” of arms twirling in characterful rhythm or seated in the audience, joy permeating your every fibre, when the opportunity to nestle within birdsong chimes, accept.

Volunteers performing in Genevieve Lacey’s Soliloquy (including Louise Jennison in blue) (image credit: Pia Johnson)

Focus on the Collection: Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison

Based in Melbourne, we work from home. And more often than not, we collaborate with each other. We rather fell into collaboration, many years ago now, and it is one based on harmony. To date, we have made 99 artists’ book titles and 127 zine titles.

We decided early on in our collaboration, through an organic process, not to polish the same skills. We naturally lent towards different things and now bring those different things together to make one work not possible without the other. Working this way, a third work is made that belongs to us both.

The two of us have been fans of the book for a long time now, and it is perhaps because no work is ever as you’d imagined or saw in your mind’s eye, that we keep working with books. Every step, every part of the process, every learning curve, holds us entranced. We love the challenge artists’ books present, the possibilities and history they hold, and the intimacy they can awaken in the reader. The flexible medium of the book holds us in its palm rather than us holding the book in our own palms. In the beginning, the medium of the artists' book seemed, to us, to be free of rules and regulations. It also presented many new things to consider, from page layout and sequence to typographical decisions, and such things we tossed in the air and arranged upon their landing. Working together has meant we were able to figure out the particulars through trial and error, and groundwork.

You can see an exhibition of our artists’ books at Artspace Mackay until the 3rd of February, 2019.

Focus on the Collection: Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison
Foyer Gallery
Artspace Mackay
Civic Centre Precinct, Gordon Street, Mackay, Queensland

The exhibition is drawn from the Mackay Regional Council collection, and it includes
Find your place, 2007
Small collection, 2008
Postcards from... a key to make your own world visible, 2009
A vagary of impediments & a sneak of weasels, 2009
Tumble & fall, 2009
This evening, however, I am thinking of things past, 2009
Closer to natural, 2016
Prattle, scoop, trembling: a flutter of Australian birds, 2016
Paw Pad Path, 2018

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Paw Pad Path, 2018, artists’ book

Dear you, dive in

Dear you,

You're invited to explore a collaged landscape comprised entirely from images scanned from borrowed library books, and studded with lenticular prints.

Cue: birdsong.

Ripples in the Open is a collage, 15 metres in length, commissioned for ArtSpace at Realm.

Ripples in the Open
Saturday 10th of November, 2018 – Sunday 27th of January, 2019
Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison
ArtSpace at Realm
Ringwood Town Square (opposite the Ringwood Railway Station)
179 Maroondah Highway, Ringwood, 3134

Officially opening this Thursday the 15th of November, 6–8pm (including a talk, by us, somewhere in the wilderness).

Cue: distant roar.

Yours, wading,
Gracia and Louise
#RipplesintheOpen

Make a Solander Box in a Day workshop

Louise Jennison is conducting a Solander Box making workshop at Firestation Print Studio in December.

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison,   An index box of Australian birds still fluttering  , 2016, collage housed in a cloth Solander box, with inlaid drawing

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, An index box of Australian birds still fluttering, 2016, collage housed in a cloth Solander box, with inlaid drawing

Make a Solander Box in a Day with Louise Jennison

In this one-day workshop with Louise, you will measure, cut, glue, cover, and construct a small Solander box. All materials are provided in a kit, including high quality binding cloth, screen board, and an instruction booklet.

Equipment and archival glue will also be provided, however please bring along your own cutting knife, and ruler.

Sunday 9 December
10am until 5pm

$260 non members
$220 for members
Price including material kits

Bookings essential

Firestation Print Studio
2 Willis Street
Armadale
03 9509 1782

Ripples in the Open zine making workshop

As part of our exhibition Ripples in the Open we are conducting a zine making workshop at Realm.

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison,   Paw Pad Path  , 2018, printed zine

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Paw Pad Path, 2018, printed zine

Join Ripples in the Open artists Gracia Haby and Louise Jennison in this fabulous zine making workshop!

Collage across the spread of your very own stitched zine. Bring along any printed and photocopied snippets, images, and text collected from your surroundings, and in the workshop you will cut and glue them into place to create your own artwork. 

In addition, you will learn to fold and stitch a simple zine structure. Paper, glue, thread, and equipment are all provided, however please bring along anything you’d like to include in your collage be they magazine cuttings, photocopies of things that interest you, original drawings. The world is your oyster; the paper is your universe!

Thursday 17 January
2 to 4pm
Ages 12+
Cost $5

Bookings essential:
www.trybooking.com/ZBZM

Meet us at ArtSpace at Realm 
Ringwood Town Square 
179 Maroondah Highway 
Ringwood 
03 9298 4553

“All for your delight”

Recently landed: “All for your delight”, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes you to the moonlit forest of Queensland Ballet’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Edwin Landseer, Scene from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Titania and Bottom, oil on canvas, 1848–51

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Recently landed: But a Dream, Gracia's written response to Queensland Ballet's A Midsummer Night’s Dream, for Fjord Review

As soft as a white rabbit’s fur: Edwin Landseer’s Scene from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Titania and Bottom (1848–51). In a down of fur, the painting, in the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria, depicts Titania, the Queen of the Fairies, besotted with Bottom, who has recently been reshaped into an ass, from William Shakespeare’s comedy of misplacement. A fairy queen and an ass, two, of opposite realms, entwined and for all to see, in the fairy dell, accompanied by the requisite fairy folk and white rabbits, and on the red wall of the salon room. In an engraving of Titania and Bottom by Henry Fuseli they, too, are encircled by a cast of magical inhabitants, and the print of ink assumes the blush of a rose. To look at both is to cross into the fairy realm. And now I shall add to this Liam Scarlett’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, created in 2016, in co-production between Queensland Ballet and Royal New Zealand Ballet.

To a silvered photograph of Vivian Leigh as Titania (on stage at the Old Vic Theatre in 1937), her right arm extended, her gaze following its line, Queensland Ballet’s Laura Hidalgo, in ethereal gown. From Frederick Ashton’s delirious ass en pointe within The Dream to Judi Dench as a loved-up, painted in green fairy queen in the Peter Hall film of 1968, my Midsummer wunderkammer continues to grow. Seated in Her Majesty’s Theatre on opening night, I am accompanied by all of these versions of Titania and Bottom. The moonlit forest I entered was a familiar one, and yet it was not. I knew I would meet old friends. I anticipated couples to be spun into complicated scenarios. I was expecting to be as bewildered as if I was also beneath a spell. Fairies, and Changlings, and Lovers, oh mischief!

Upon a stage made iridescent by fairy benevolence, Queensland Ballet have brought this magic to Melbourne on tour. First performed by Queensland Ballet in 2016, with set and costume design by Tracy Grant Lord, the palette may be brighter than a glow-stick, but it wears its heart upon its wing. In Scarlett’s choreography, the cast of characters, from Cobwebb and Moth to Lovers contrary, in the few moments they did pause, they did so in a circular formation, echoing Landseer and Fuseli’s compositions. And Oberon, performed by Victor Estévez, sported exaggerated winged eye makeup not so dissimilar to the photographic still of Leigh. See and hear the cymbals and triangles upon his arrival! There are, and will continue to be, many versions of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and for them to work, for me, they must be infused with Shakespeare’s own lines plucked from the page: “Our true intent is. All for your delight”. And delight it was.

Laura Hidalgo and artists from Queensland Ballet perform  A Midsummer Night’s Dream  (image credit: David Kelly)

Laura Hidalgo and artists from Queensland Ballet perform A Midsummer Night’s Dream (image credit: David Kelly)