Chunky Move's L U C I D

Recently landed: Close Up, Gracia's written response to Chunky Moves's L U C I D, for Fjord Review

Tragic, fallen, everyday. Burning bright, buffed, and admired: heroes come in myriad forms. Sporting capes or a guitar slung over the shoulder, some become intertwined with idols to worship. And all can be distilled to an inspirational quote to share on Instagram.

Said Superman, as Christopher Reeve: "A hero is an ordinary individual who finds the strength to persevere and endure in spite of overwhelming obstacles." Quick, print that on a coffee mug, t-shirt, tote bag. The world needs more tote bags.

And Mark Twain, some time before that: "We find not much in ourselves to admire, we are always privately wanting to be like somebody else. If everybody was satisfied with himself, there would be no heroes." Hold the print run. That quote’s not ‘upbeat’ enough. Too much self-analysis required.

From the Greek word meaning "warrior, protector," our heroes grace bedroom walls in poster format. Paper shrines to self-made deities, my own teenage bedroom walls were a mashup of posters of the Ramones, the Meanies, the Clash, and Fugazi. Pinned and Blu-tacked, layered and many, they were me and I was them; hero symbiosis. Going by Anouk van Dijk’s new work, L U C I D for Chunky Move, I imagine Lauren Langlois’ walls featured Audrey Hepburn alongside Hank Williams and Sylvester Stallone, a triptych of talent and admirable traits. Oh to move like Hepburn, croon like Williams, and swing a right hook like Rocky. And Stephen Phillips, posters of Willem Dafoe’s Sergeant Elias falling to his knees in the Oliver Stone classic. Cue: Samuel Barber’s Adagio for Strings a.k.a. the Saddest Song.

Stephen Phillips and Lauren Langlois in Chunky Move's L U C I D (Image credit: Pippa Samaya)