Posts tagged Madeleine Eastoe
Age of Magic

Recently landed: Age of Magic, Gracia's written response for Fjord Review

In this Cinderella, nothing is fixed and quite as it seems: From the Fairy Godmother tipping her bowler hat to René Magritte, to the topiary in the royal gardens inverting the laws of nature, converting at midnight to Man Ray worthy metronomes, Ratmansky’s Cinderella remains a conduit to a parallel universe. For me, it called to mind the Golden Age of Magic, from a time when Harry Houdini could make elephants vanish, and handcuffed and chained, he himself could escape from a box of solid iron. The art of illusion and escape typified by such magicians is not so very different to the theatre. A terrific showman, Houdini would stay submerged in his watery cell for longer than he needed to escape in order to build tension and increase the suspense; not so very unlike the explosive arrival of the ardent Prince—at last!—in act II epitomised by both Gaudiello and Guo’s seeming defiance of gravity as they soared higher and higher. In Ratmansky’s Cinderella every character knows how to make an entrance.

Illusion lies at the heart of this fairy tale. If I looked closely, I could see how Cinderella’s Fairy Godmother transformed her attire from rags to Christian Dior New-Look style gown of pure white tulle and gold lamé. If I looked, I could see Cinderella’s 'magical appearance' at the ball was actually one of 'look over there' staging. If I looked ... But this of course is not what I chose to focus upon. I chose to focus upon the magical effect. I submit completely to the offer of escapism, be it within a play, film, opera, or ballet. Uninterrupted escapism is a rare treat only a fool would choose to squander. Moreover, in doing so, it makes a marshmallow of me at act II’s heartbreaking close.

Madeleine Eastoe as Cinderella (Image credit: Jeff Busby)

No rest for the wilis

Recently landed: No rest for the wilis, Gracia's written response for Fjord Review

In light of Eastoe’s announcement to retire now forever netted to Giselle’s spectral maidens, I like to think I saw an extra flicker of considered clemency in Hendricks’ beguiling and truly imposing Queen, as Eastoe entreated her to spare Jackson. It was present in Jackson’s aching tenderness, a twice-laced awareness of something wonderful coming to a close. This recognition was poured into and made a part of the ghostly Wilis/corps as they were forced with backs turned to listen but not see Eastoe and Jackson’s pleading duet that felt as if it had always been, and hoped would always continue to be. It was present in former Principal Artist, and one of the great Giselle’s, Bolte’s heartfelt consoling of Giselle/Eastoe as she unwove her hair, in "a lovely full circle". And it was there as Juliet Burnett, as one of Giselle’s Friends, clasped her hands to her face in show of shared grief during the famous mad scene.

Such beguilement by moonlight! Keep the dawn at bay! Under a fine gossamer veil, in bid to savor the ‘ballet-fantastique’, it is there that I choose to stay.

Madeleine Eastoe and Kevin Jackson in Giselle (Image credit: Jeff Busby)

Farewells and other performances

Recently landed: Farewells and other performances, a new post on Elsewhere (by Louise)

By way of thanks and in delicious anticipation of The Australian Ballet's Madeleine Eastoe's second last Melbourne performance, we have collaged our bouquet (upon a borrowed promotional photo by Georges Antoni with Madeleine Eastoe and Chengwu Guo for The Dream)