Posts tagged collaboration
BLINDSIDE'S B-SIDE

We have created With your hand on my cheek, I looked up at the sky, 2017, especially for BLINDSIDE'S B-SIDE fundraiser exhibition. Our inkjet print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag 308gsm, 16. 5 cm x 16.5 cm, is available for a song on the opening night, and our (bright, beautiful, brilliant) B-side is none other than (brimming with all good things) Mr. Theo Strasser.

Friday 3rd – Friday 10th of November, 2017
BLINDSIDE
Room 14, Level 7, 37 Swanston Street, Melbourne

Launching this Thursday 2nd November from 6pm. See you there.

For B-SIDE, BLINDSIDE will present a large scale exhibition of works for sale by our accomplished and significant alumni. Exactly half of the work in B-SIDE will be hidden. Each artwork on display in B-SIDE will be linked to a partner work (a b-side), which will be revealed only to the buyer. As a fundraising exhibition B-SIDE will support the ongoing activity of BLINDSIDE into the future. For the past 14 years BLINDSIDE has provided a vibrant space for artists to test ideas and challenge conventions. B-SIDE will facilitate BLINDSIDE's continued program of experimental exhibitions, critical and engaging public programs, as well as support arts writers, curators and artists at all stages of their careers.

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS AND THEIR B-SIDE:

Adriane Hayward with Anna Dunnill
Alica Bryson-Haynes & Ria Green with Lizzy Sampson
Andrew Tetzlaff with Ania Walwicz
Boe-Lin Bastian with Elyss McCleary
Bridie Lunney with Sophie Cape
Carly Fischer with Shannon Lyons
Ceri Hann with Lynda Roberts
Charles O'Loughlin with Amy May Stuart
Chris Bond with Wes Thorne
Claire Anna Watson with Sarah Wilmot
Claire Mooney with Natalie Mather
Clare Rae with Melanie Irwin
Colleen Boyle with Rebecca Najdowski
Craig Easton with Joyce Huang
David Thomas with Rushdi Anwar
Diego Ramirez with Katie Paine
Drew Pettifer with Louis Cooper
Eva Heiky Olga Abbinga with Ceclia Dowling
Gabriel Tongue Nilsen with Billy Bartley Nees
Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison with Theo Strasser
Hana Vasak with Jacqueline Stojanovic
Hannah Raisin with Tsohil Bhatia
Hanna Tai with Eliza Turnbull
Jessica Curry with Harry McLean
Jessie Scott with Miranda Leibscher
John Brooks with Audrey Tan
Julia Powles with Peter Westwood
Kate Just with Kellie Wells
Kate Robertson with Kirsty Macafee
Kate Rohde with Emma Homfray
Kate Shaw with Siobhan Ryan
Kawita Vatanajyankur with Kunthong Sumree
Kiron Robinson with Tori Lill
Leslie Eastman with Natasha Johns-Messenger
Lucie McIntosh with Maya Chakraborty
Martina Copley with Francesca Rendle-Short
Melanie Jayne Taylor with Marc Sancho
Nicholas Chilvers with Peter Clynes
Penelope Hunt with Tara Gilbee
Peter Westwood with Julia Powles
Phuong Ngo with Kali Michailidis
Pip Ryan with Natalie Ryan
Ria Green with Clare Humphries
Ross Coulter with Ben Burgess
Ruth Johnstone with Barbe Scarlette
si ma va with Anonymous
Steven Rendall with Andrea Eckersley
Tai Snaith with Sean M Whelan
Xanthe Dobbie with Elizabeth Mitchell

Self-made: Zines and Artist Books, State Library Victoria

Our artists' book, A Deck of Salvaged Relatives, and two accompanying zines, are currently on display as part of Self-made: Zines and Artist Books in the Blue Rotunda, Cowen Gallery at the State Library Victoria, until the 12th of November, 2017.

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, A Deck of Salvaged Relatives (detail), 2015, artists' book

Looped opens in the Dome, State Library Victoria blog

Looped opens in the Dome
State Library Victoria blog
The Dome was already one of the most beautiful rooms in Melbourne and now it’s even more so. Looped: artist books in the round, our new display by artists Gracia Haby and Louise Jennison, opened on 4 August in the La Trobe Reading Room. Gracia and Louise have turned the cabinet cases around the Reading Room’s dais into pages in a story. They’ve created five artist books that, through collage and the written word, tell a complete tale. It’ll be on display in the La Trobe Reading Room until 26 November. To celebrate the display, Gracia and Louise took over our Instagram account on 4 August to introduce themselves and share their work.

Installing Looped in the La Trobe Reading Room, SLV, early in the morning

Punk, politics and art on show in new exhibition at State Library Victoria

We're thrilled to have our zines and artists' book included in the forthcoming exhibition, Self-made: Zines and Artist Books. Read Punk, politics and art on show in new exhibition at State Library Victoria to discover more.

Developed in partnership with The Sticky Institute, Self-made will display rarely-seen material from the Library’s collection of artist books and its zine collection — the largest and most comprehensive in Australia. Exhibition curator Monica Syrette said Self-made will take visitors on a journey through the colourful and sometimes controversial evolution of self-publishing.

"The history of zine-making and self-publishing is inextricably linked to influential counter-cultural movements and social activism. What we’re displaying — items like sci-fi zines from the 1940s, punk zines from the seventies and contemporary feminist zines — are all reflections of the political and cultural movements of the time. The artist books in Self-made were also ground-breaking, designed to circumvent the commercial gallery system and make art easily available to all."

The exhibition features works by leading international artists including Swiss German artist, Dieter Roth; Pop Art influenced American artist, Ed Ruscha; pioneering conceptual artist Sol LeWitt; and renowned Australian painter, sculptor and printmaker, Robert Jacks; alongside works by contemporary artists and zine-makers. More than 170 works will be on display, including a dedicated reading lounge, revealing the breadth and beauty of artist books and zines.

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, A Deck of Salvaged Relatives (detail), 2015, artists' book

Finito

Recently landed: Finitoa new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes a look at the recent the NGV's Melbourne Art Book Fair

Melbourne Art Book Fair in flight (image credit: Tobias Titz (detail))

NGV Melbourne Art Book Fair

The Melbourne Art Book Fair is all set to go! go! go! We'll be there. Will you?

Swing by, say hi, and collect your pre-ordered copy of #PrattleScoopTrembling too.

National Gallery of Victoria presents:
Melbourne Art Book Fair 2017
Great Hall
National Gallery of Victoria
Thursday 16th – Sunday 19th March, 2017

Thursday 16th March: Typography Symposium 10am–5pm
Friday 17th March: 10am–5pm
Friday Party (ticketed): 7.30–10pm
Saturday 18th March: 10am–8pm
Sunday 19th March 10am–5pm
(Free entry at NGV International. Prices are noted for ticketed programs and events.)

Until then, keep a spare eye on #theworkingtable to see what we are making especially for the fair.

Preorder an edition of Prattle, scoop, trembling: a flutter of Australian birds

While the preorder campaign (to assist with the printing costs) has folded its wings, it is still possible to reserve a copy of Prattle, scoop, trembling: a flutter of Australian birds through our online store.

We will be releasing the book from our stall at this year's NGV Melbourne Art Book Fair, where you are welcome to pick up your preordered copies from us (from Friday the 17th to Sunday the 19th of March, 2017).

Digital mock-up of one of five different hand-cut bird inserts

Milly Sleeping: SHOE

Tiny Tap, a moving collage, in something of a growing tradition, created especially for Milly Sleeping's October month of SHOE project on instagram. 50 looped frames and fireflies to make Pietro Longhi's Portrait of a Venetian Family with a Manservant Serving Coffee, c. 1752, tappity-tap.

Earlier,
Ornament, 2015
Nice Work, 2013
To Good Year's End, 2012
Hidden Gems & Rough Diamonds, 2012
I Feel Fine and Borrow, 2009

Tiny Tap for Milly Sleeping

Rolling Stones

Recently landed: Rolling Stones, Gracia's written response to Melanie Lane and Juliet Burnett's Re-make, and Jo Lloyd and Nicola Gunn's Mermermer, presented at Chunky Move Studios as part of Next Move 9, for Fjord Review

"The gods had condemned Sisyphus to ceaselessly rolling a rock to the top of a mountain, whence the stone would fall back of its own weight. They had thought with some reason that there is no more dreadful punishment than futile and hopeless labor.” To me, this is what the creative process can feel like. Creativity is resilience and determination that comes to the fore when tested; when we “re-visit, re-spond and re-invent.”

And so Re-make, one of two commissioned works in Chunky Move’s ninth Next Move performance season, began with Juliet Burnett repeating the same steps over and over, returning to the same marker. “The stage sets collapse[d]…. and Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday and Sunday [operated] according to the same rhythm,” but as they did, the steps slowly changed. This is growth and reinvention through repetition.

In Re-make, references to Greek Mythology and Camus’s philosophy of the absurd, to the eternal labours of Sisyphus and his boulder, abound. And Burnett is stronger than her rock and the likelihood of hearing her effort is zero. At best, you will see a circle of sweat at her armpits and in the small of her back grow in size. And in her descent, she will turn into a bird; a silver-winged Phoenix, with a guitar plectrum for a beak and red heeled talons. This work may be the result of a conversation with choreographer and performer, Melanie Lane, but I cannot help read it as a portrait of Burnett’s own artistic career as she finds her true creative voice. This is “a solo for two.”

Melanie Lane and Juliet Burnett in Re-make (Image credit: Gregory Lorenzutti)

Vocation, calling, métier, niche

Along with fellow alumni, Vincent Fantauzzo, Nicola Gunn, Katie Collins, Kieren Seymour, and Xanthe Dobbie, we were invited to take part in 'Developing your career in art: Being enterprise ready,' presented by the School of Art in collaboration with Careers and Employability, at Storey Hall, RMIT.

To illustrate our words and thoughts, we created two screen recordings, 'Digital portfolio strategies and examples' and 'Developing a niche market as an artist outside the established systems,' in advance, especially for RMIT School of Art students.

And you, too, can now see them, should they be of interest.

Earlier, installing Salvaged Relatives both drawn and collaged in the windows of Obus (Cathedral Arcade) and the Collected Works bookstore (Nicholas Building), as part of BLINDSIDE's On the Verge festival, 2016

And we stood alone in the silent night

Our artists' book, And we stood alone in the silent night (2008), in the collection of the State Library of Queensland, is discussed by Siganto Foundation Research Fellow, Victoria Cooper, in Reading Montages: perceptions, dilemmas, edges and resolution.

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Because I Like You, 2016, artists' book

Responding to terminology dilemma:
As I progress through the research I am continually confronted with terminology issues and questions regarding the nature of montage and its intersection with collage. The dilemma is with me as a kind of Sisyphean cycle where, after climbing the mountain of wondrous diversity in the Australian Library of Art artists’ book collection; I am drawn back down by the weighty issues of inconsistent terminology.


Many artists, who cut, arrange and glue disparate and/or mixed media elements refer to their work as collage or for computer made images, digital collage. This should be the end of the debate as the etymology of collage is the French word ‘to glue’. But there are others who cut and piece together disparate elements and ‘glue’ and then fuse them within the image and refer to their process as montage (or digital montage for computer images). Also interesting to note is that the origin of the word montage is a French word meaning ‘to mount’. Is there a need to differentiate between these similar practices? Does terminology affect the ‘reading’ of these works? In my art practice I refer to myself as a montage maker, thinker and reader and as such I bring my own perspective to reading visual narratives.

Gracia Haby and Louise Jennison, who prefer to be known as paper artists, make collage works. Their unique state artists’ books and democratic multiples in the form of zines and editions of artists’ books have a place within this discussion.

Haby and Jennison responded to my email question regarding the nature of the digital work in their book,
And we stood alone in the silent night, where they state that: ‘Digital collages are made in chorus with unique state pieces. They are all a means of making, with the ‘how’ of lesser interest to us than the ‘why’ or ‘message’.

In their statement above they suggest that the means of the making is secondary to the final work. Even when the collage has been digitally scanned and then printed it remains, for them, a collage.

The book, And we stood alone in the silent night, presents the reader with an enchanted narrative through the composition of images and poetic texts across the pages. Underpinning the reading is the smooth and seamless joins of the elements creating a surreal landscape with a theatre of colourful inhabitants. The compositional elements draw the reader into a kind of Alice in Wonderland experience of reading: where the fused elements are arranged in a mise en page; and the turning page emulates the scenes of a paper movie [i]. The small size text comes through the reading as a poetic aside to underscore the scene.

Haby and Jennison’s careful cutting and pasting of added elements over or alongside the original image distinguish their broader collage work. Again, in these works the silent edges between these interventions and the original image provide uninterrupted reading. Importantly as this transition or interval between the elements goes unnoticed the added element ultimately colonize the interior space and time of the original image.

[i] Lou Stoumen is the author of visual books including
Can’t Argue With Sunrise: A Paper Movie (1975)
Borrowed and cut

Recently landed: Borrowed and cut, a new post on High Up in the Trees (by Gracia)

Costume design, replete with orange sash, silver trims, and light green fan, by Attilio Comelli for act two from the musical The Girl From Utah, c.1913, upon a photograph of the stage set for the musical comedy Follow Through, 1930 or 1932