Posts tagged moving parts
It was a familiar pattern

Our collage of moving parts, It was a familiar pattern, 2017, was created especially for Milly Sleeping's exhibition, Unusual.

Unusual, curated by Leah Muddle, included works by Alexi Freeman, Alice Hutchison, Aly Peel, Anna Varendorff, Birgetta Helmersson, Elise Sheehan, Elizabeth Yong, Katherine Bowman, Ivett Simon, Jessilla Rogers, Seb Brown, Suzan Dlouhy, Vikki Kassioras, and us.

Last days of something Unusual

Last weekend to see our collage of moving parts, It was a familiar pattern, tickling the walls of Milly Sleeping.

Unusual
Fourteen local makers present new works using ideas, methods or materials that differ from their usual modes.
Until Sunday 29th of October, 2017
Milly Sleeping
157 Elgin Street, Carlton

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, It was a familiar pattern (detail), 2017, moving collage

Unusual at Milly Sleeping

We're thrilled to be a part of Milly Sleeping's forthcoming exhibition, and have created a moving collage projection.

Unusual
Fourteen local makers present new works using ideas, methods or materials that differ from their usual modes.
Wednesday 11th – Sunday 29th of October, 2017
Milly Sleeping
157 Elgin Street, Carlton

Launching this Saturday 14th October from 4.30pm. See you there.

Milly Sleeping: SHOE

Tiny Tap, a moving collage, in something of a growing tradition, created especially for Milly Sleeping's October month of SHOE project on instagram. 50 looped frames and fireflies to make Pietro Longhi's Portrait of a Venetian Family with a Manservant Serving Coffee, c. 1752, tappity-tap.

Earlier,
Ornament, 2015
Nice Work, 2013
To Good Year's End, 2012
Hidden Gems & Rough Diamonds, 2012
I Feel Fine and Borrow, 2009

Tiny Tap for Milly Sleeping

Pins in spin

Recently landed: Pins in spin, a new post on High Up in the Trees (by Gracia)

The gentlest of owls. the Laughing owl (Sceloglaux albifacies). Last recorded sighting July, 1914. "It could always be brought from its lurking place in the rocks, after dusk, by the strains of an accordion....the bird would silently flit over the face of the performer and finally take up its station in the vicinity, and remain within easy hearing till [the music] had ceased." —Sir Walter Buller, New Zealand ornithologist