Posts tagged nature
“The stability of nature can no longer be taken for granted”

Recently landed: “The stability of nature can no longer be taken for granted”, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) looks at our functioning (or not) ecosystem on the page as part of our forthcoming exhibition, It came like light out of the walls

A Pacific walrus rests at the top of steep cliffs in Russia, still from ‘Frozen Worlds’ episode, Our Planet, 2019 (image credit: Sophie Lanfear/Silverback/Netflix)

Keep an eye on

Recently landed: Keep an eye on, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) introduces you to the prints within our current exhibition

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Not a royal residence but a garrison fortress, lithograph with hand-colouring. Image drawn directly on to the lithographic plates by the Artists and processed, proofed and printed in three colours from three plates, by APW Printer Martin King and hand-coloured by the Artists, at Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, 2019.

Trees of Life for The Big Issue

Happy to see our collage created especially for Sophie Cunningham’s City of Trees: Essays on Life, Death and the Need for a Forest (‘Trees of Life’ by Raphaelle Race, p. 30) in the current edition of The Big Issue (17–30 May, 2019, No. 587), with Greta Thurnberg on the cover.

We heartily recommend you grab a copy of both book and magazine.

Open until the 28th of January!

Hoot! Hoot! Our exhibition, Ripples in the Open, was meant to close today at 5pm, however we are delighted to announce that it will be open for tomorrow’s public holiday, Monday the 28th of January, from 9am to 5pm.

Ripples in the Open
ArtSpace at Realm
Ringwood Town Square (opposite the Ringwood Railway Station)
179 Maroondah Highway, Ringwood, 3134

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Ripples in the Open, 2018 (image credit: Andrew Curtis)

Ripples at Realm

You’re invited to our exhibition, Ripples in the Open, and we’d love to see you there.

Join us for the exciting exhibition opening of Ripples in the Open by Melbourne based artists Gracia Haby and Louise Jennison.

6pm to 8pm Thursday 15 November at ArtSpace Realm

To be opened by the Mayor of Maroondah City Council on Thursday 15 November at 6pm, to be followed with a talk by the artists about the process of imagining and creating their captivating works — from the intimate to the monumental.

Gracia Haby and Louise Jennison have been commissioned to create a huge collage for ArtSpace at Realm, presented as a floor-to-ceiling printed landscape featuring portholes of moving collage comprised of stunning lenticular prints of animals. 

This exhibition invites you to join the artists in an exploration of things hidden in plain sight and to be immersed in an imaginary and not-so imaginary world.

Exhibition Dates: 10 November 2018 to 27 January 2019

ArtSpace at Realm
Ringwood Town Square (opposite Ringwood Railway Station)
179 Maroondah Highway
Ringwood 3134
03 9298 455

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“In a little yellow house with green door and shutters”

Recently landed: "In a little yellow house with green door and shutters", a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia), part 3, in Amsterdam, post French Connections

And so we walked and walked the curves of Amsterdam, before ending up at a market where we feasted on a potato and spinach gözleme made over a griddle with the second nature swiftness and assurance of hand like a bird on the wing

And so we walked and walked the curves of Amsterdam, before ending up at a market where we feasted on a potato and spinach gözleme made over a griddle with the second nature swiftness and assurance of hand like a bird on the wing

Paw Pad Path on display

There is still time to see our artists' book, Paw Pad Path, on display as part of the 2018 Libris Awards: Australian Artists' Book Prize at Artspace Mackay. The exhibition, which opened on Saturday the 26th of May, runs until Sunday the 19th of August, 2018.

Artspace Mackay, Civic Centre Precinct, Gordon Street, Queensland

Up!

Recently landed: Up!, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) takes a closer look at a recent commission, A Weight of Albatross.

We’ve seen albatrosses come back with their belly full of food for their young. You think it’s going to be squid, but it’s plastic. That chick is going to starve and die.
— Sir David Attenborough (on plastic pollution)

A Weight of Albatross, installed

Up! Up! Up they went.

After the building had closed, with birds and crimps under wing, we tiptoed into Realm, with Richard Holt, to install our commissioned work, A Weight of Albatross. We woke our rookery of albatross(es)* from their bubble wrap nests, and began threading the piece together, with a map for guidance. By 11pm, our two stainless steel and fourteen frosted perspex birds were in place.

Watch: A Weight of Albatross being installed at Realm, time-lapse video (courtesy of City of Maroondah)

Realm, Ringwood Town Square, 179 Maroondah Hwy, Ringwood

Installing  A Weight of Albatross

Installing A Weight of Albatross

* The most common collective noun for a group of albatross is a rookery, but a weight is also accepted, and though the OED preferences albatrosses as the plural, Collins and Merriam-Webster are happy to fly with albatross. So a weight it is, A Weight of Albatross, because it sounds more poetic to our ears.

Included in our weight you will find a Wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans), Southern royal albatross (Diomedea epomophora), Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis), Black-browed albatross (Thalassarche melanophris), Shy albatross (Thalassarche cauta), Grey-headed albatross (Thalassarche chrysostoma), Indian yellow-nosed albatross (Thalassarche carteri), Sooty albatross (Phoebetria fusca), and a Buller’s albatross (Thalassarche bulleri).

Animal Nature

Recently landed: Animal Nature, Gracia's written response to Stephanie Lake's new work, Replica, for Fjord Review

From modern Latin, from the Greek words sumbiōsis, ‘a living together,’ sumbioun, ‘live together,’ and sumbios, ‘companion’ comes the word symbiosis, an interaction between two different organisms living in close physical association, typically to the advantage of both. In the dictionary, the very definition of a symbiotic relationship, why, it almost sounds like a pas de deux. A ‘step of two’ performed by dancers working together, dependent upon each other, with each other, in synchronicity, aware, at all times, of the other.

In Stephanie Lake’s new work, Replica, Christina Chan and Aymeric Bichon embody this definition. From the outset, they are two different organisms mutually dependent upon the other, moving to the benefit of both, or so it seems. In the dark of the theatre in the Northcote Town Hall, as they stand before a strip of light on the floor, they are the bodily incarnation of mutualism. Bichon moves and Chan responds; Chan moves and Bichon responds. Two silhouettes in accord, making ‘a living together’ through togetherness. You scratch my back; I’ll scratch yours. You tap my left shoulder; I’ll tap yours. My arm draws a large circle in the air. My hand lands upon your head. With the tap, you begin to fall, but not before extending your arms forward and tapping at my abdomen. A push here, a poke there, no cause is without effect. We all fall down. Ring-a-ring o’ roses; a pocket full of posies; a-tishoo! A-tishoo! We all fall down; it’s human nature, after all.

Human nature, animal nature, it is one and the same, whether in the dictionary or the nursery rhyme; the slowest faces a penalty, the weakest in the herd is more at risk of falling prey to a predator. Best pair up with another; make a replica of their survival techniques through movement; and remember that if we all fall down, we can also all climb up. Take my hand; pull me up. In ecological rings, in biological terms, a symbiotic relationship between two or more species can be beneficial to all organisms involved (mutualism) or none (competition), and it can benefit one organism without affecting the others (commensalism) or help one while harming the others (parasitism). In Replica, Chan and Bichon, take turns trying on all four caps for size, from mutualism to parasitism, drawing for me the nature of things as the needle traces the groove and the lights shift from dark to light, warm to cool, red to blue. Lake’s choreography, Robin Fox’s sound composition, and Bosco Shaw’s lighting design all follow the same principle. Chan’s hand connects with a part of Bichon and the sound in symbiotic understanding changes. Bichon claps, the lighting alters in response. There is more than one relationship involved here.

Christina Chan and Aymeric Bichon in Stephanie Lake's Replica (image credit: Pippa Samaya)

A Weight of Albatross

Recently landed: A Weight of Albatross, a new article on Marginalia (by Gracia) looks at a new commission at Realm

In progress, A Weight of Albatross, at Realm, Maroondah City Council’s new library, cultural, knowledge and innovation centre, Ringwood Town Square, Victoria