Posts tagged umwelt
Open until the 28th of January!

Hoot! Hoot! Our exhibition, Ripples in the Open, was meant to close today at 5pm, however we are delighted to announce that it will be open for tomorrow’s public holiday, Monday the 28th of January, from 9am to 5pm.

Ripples in the Open
ArtSpace at Realm
Ringwood Town Square (opposite the Ringwood Railway Station)
179 Maroondah Highway, Ringwood, 3134

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Ripples in the Open, 2018 (image credit: Andrew Curtis)

Dear you, dive in

Dear you,

You're invited to explore a collaged landscape comprised entirely from images scanned from borrowed library books, and studded with lenticular prints.

Cue: birdsong.

Ripples in the Open is a collage, 15 metres in length, commissioned for ArtSpace at Realm.

Ripples in the Open
Saturday 10th of November, 2018 – Sunday 27th of January, 2019
Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison
ArtSpace at Realm
Ringwood Town Square (opposite the Ringwood Railway Station)
179 Maroondah Highway, Ringwood, 3134

Officially opening this Thursday the 15th of November, 6–8pm (including a talk, by us, somewhere in the wilderness).

Cue: distant roar.

Yours, wading,
Gracia and Louise
#RipplesintheOpen

Gracia Haby & Louise Jennison, Ripples in the Open, 2018

Ripples at Realm

You’re invited to our exhibition, Ripples in the Open, and we’d love to see you there.

Join us for the exciting exhibition opening of Ripples in the Open by Melbourne based artists Gracia Haby and Louise Jennison.

6pm to 8pm Thursday 15 November at ArtSpace Realm

To be opened by the Mayor of Maroondah City Council on Thursday 15 November at 6pm, to be followed with a talk by the artists about the process of imagining and creating their captivating works — from the intimate to the monumental.

Gracia Haby and Louise Jennison have been commissioned to create a huge collage for ArtSpace at Realm, presented as a floor-to-ceiling printed landscape featuring portholes of moving collage comprised of stunning lenticular prints of animals. 

This exhibition invites you to join the artists in an exploration of things hidden in plain sight and to be immersed in an imaginary and not-so imaginary world.

Exhibition Dates: 10 November 2018 to 27 January 2019

ArtSpace at Realm
Ringwood Town Square (opposite Ringwood Railway Station)
179 Maroondah Highway
Ringwood 3134
03 9298 455

Gracia+Haby+and+Louise+Jennison_lenticular_number+2_middle.jpg
Paw Pad Path on display

There is still time to see our artists' book, Paw Pad Path, on display as part of the 2018 Libris Awards: Australian Artists' Book Prize at Artspace Mackay. The exhibition, which opened on Saturday the 26th of May, runs until Sunday the 19th of August, 2018.

Artspace Mackay, Civic Centre Precinct, Gordon Street, Queensland

Artspace Mackay

The space between our understanding of the world and how a fox (in a painting) sees the world is vast, but this is what we were thinking, dreaming, scratching, sniffing, living as we worked on our most recent artists' book, Paw Pad Path (2018). It is of the earth as much as of the canvas and of history. And we are delighted that Paw Pad Path has been selected for the forthcoming 2018 Libris Awards: Australian Artists' Book Prize exhibition at Artspace Mackay.

2018 Libris Awards: Australian Artists' Book Prize
Artspace Mackay
Civic Centre Precinct, Gordon Street, Queensland
Saturday 26th May – Sunday 19th August, 2018

The Libris Awards is an initiative of Mackay Regional Council through Artspace Mackay. The awards seek to develop awareness of the council’s significant collection of artists' books, and to develop the collection further through the acquisition of new works by leading Australian artists working in the field.

Our artists’ book,  Paw Pad Path ,  is set to travel to Artspace Mackay  to be exhibited as part of the  2018 Libris Awards , and we are thrilled

Our artists’ book, Paw Pad Path, is set to travel to Artspace Mackay to be exhibited as part of the 2018 Libris Awards, and we are thrilled

Ros Warby Returns

Recently landed: Ros Warby Returns, Gracia's written response for Fjord Review

"The spaces we inhabit can frame our experience. How we see, and relate to each other and the world, inspire what we imagine, create, build and destroy. Hierarchies exist, however small, and we navigate them daily. And the body seems to tell all." The body is an incredible vessel; a physical form capable of invoking meaning through a singular gesture, a tilt of the head, a leg extended, an arm hinged at the elbow like a tent; and shown in sequence, in a dance that prowls and covers every inch of the stage as if testing its confines, it is potent. And for the course of a December evening, the space we inhabited was the seemingly infinite darkness of the Sylvia Staehli theatre at Dancehouse. We had come to see Ros Warby perform, for two nights only, a work still in unsettled form, in the process of development, Court Dance (2014), and an adaptation and performance of No Time to Fly (2010).

This double bill proved to be my own long-overdue introduction to Ros Warby’s work experienced with my own eyes, and I lapped up the experience. Several days later, having seeped into my thoughts and made a roost there, I am conscious that I missed a terrific deal. Moreover, this is exciting, this iceberg tip. These two pieces, presented with a small interval of barely three minutes, time enough for a costume change (Warby) and a bewildered and amazed headshake (me), with its grace, curious language (both of the body and spoken), and cerebral titillation, tapped into my curiosity to know more. I sat entranced by the carnival of shapes that Warby could make that leapt from the tentative exploration of a limb's sturdiness to a magnificent fluid bend. If we understand the world and our place in it, though our body, aware that the very space it occupies informs our perception, I desire the lion's share of my lessons to be in such a classroom. For now, I take heart in Warby’s own words about her work
Tower Suites (2012), from which Court Dance extends, that whilst this knowledge and "these events are embedded in our systems and psyches already, .... the work is not supposed to be weighed down with these references, but rather allows them to be there in the context of our day-to-day lives; and perhaps reminds us how we relate — to each other and the world we live in."

Ros Warby performing at Dancehouse, Melbourne (Image credit: Gregory Lorenzutti)

In a dance that prowls and covers every inch of the stage as if testing its confines

Recently landed: In a dance that prowls and covers every inch of the stage as if testing its confines, a new post on High Up in the Trees (by Gracia) takes you to Recovery at The Substation

Gracia Haby, In the borrowed costume of Prince Charming from The Sleeping Princess, circa 1921, with a Black-bearded saki (Chiropotes satanas), 2014, collage on cabinet card